Spooky New England: Here Lies the Body...


      Oooooh, its foggy and gray and cool today--- with bright autumn leaves fluttering to the ground and something mysterious in the air--- it's the week of Halloween, of course!~
    In honor of this merry spooky time, I thought I'd share with you some frightfully lovely highlights from my New England trip--- because no place does spooky and beautiful quite like New England!
   So-- I'm going to have "spooky New England" week here on the blog! Sound good? Well, get on your walking shoes and a nice comfy sweater, because we have some graveyards to explore....


    First up--- The Old Burial Point in the middle of town in Salem, Mass. This was the first cemetery Alyson and Emily and I rambled through and really explored well. It was funny, we'd all fan out without a word and start exploring quietly on our own. I was in awe of seeing tombstones that were so old--- and the art was so interesting and of course, melancholy.
   No "witches" buried here--- they were not permitted on sacred ground. But Judge Hathorne was in residence. Bet he had some explaining to do when he met his maker!


    We also visited the nearby town of Marblehead, Mass. which had one of the most beautiful old cemeteries I'd ever seen--- complete with a view of antique homes and the harbor full of boats.
   Old Burial Hill was also home to some beautiful old stones--- I was often awed at the thought of who were these artists who made their living in this way? And how many generations had trudged up that rocky hill to put loved ones to rest? The idea of centuries of well worn paths and heavy hearts was almost too much sometimes. But it was also incredibly peaceful--- even restful-- in these quiet places.




    There were many gravestones that tugged on this mama's heart--- especially those of children, and many times multiple children, who all passed so young. Perhaps the most gripping and sobering headstone, however, was this one on top of a burial mound in Deerfield, Mass.
   It paid homage to the 48 men, women and children massacred in an attack on the town during the French and Indian War. It really hit home just how vulnerable these settlers were, and what a dangerous time it was-- for all on all sides.
  Sadly, Deerfield would be victim to more raids than just this one, but the town remained and became a beautiful and peaceful settlement. Sometimes we forget, however, just how dangerous and violent those times long past truly were.



   Of course, the cemetery that wins the prize of "most who's who" in residence would be the Granary Burial Ground in Boston! Not only are Benjamin Franklin's parents here, but also such notables as Sam Adams, Paul Revere, and John Hancock (with a headstone as large as his signature on the Declaration of Independence!)
   It was a rainy cold day when Alyson and I wandered through this place, with leaves falling and little brown sparrows hopping everywhere, unconcerned with the people milling through. It was beautiful and still, even though it was literally in the heart of the bustle of Boston. 


.....And so, we've come to the end of our little jaunt. Time to head in out of the rain and cold, and back to the comforts of indoors. Hope no wayward spirit followed you home.....

   Til next time,
~h

9 comments

  1. Ohhhhhh, I love a bit of spookiness this week of Halloween. Old graveyards are so interesting with their headstone engravings! The photos remind me of what it might have looked like on that famous ride of Ichobade Crane and the scary encounter with the Headless Horseman!

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  2. I LOVE old cemetery pictures! I went and photographed some stuff at our town's two oldest cemeteries last week, but the oldest graves there were from the early 1870s. NOTHING this cool! Wonderful post. I need to go to New England in the fall someday, definitely.

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  3. oohhh... love the tour! I can't wait to see what else you have to share this week!
    blessings
    ~*~

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  4. Love old graveyards and tombstones! So historical, beautiful, and peaceful. The stone carvers were true artists, weren't they?

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  5. Old graveyards and tombstones have such history!

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  6. Thank you for sharing these beautiful cemetery pictures! I love cemeteries so much, they are very peaceful and so full of histories. I can't wait to be able to visit some old New England ones!

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  7. Oh gosh, Heather, you have reminded me of how lucky I am to live with graveyards such as these nearby. I've seen the one in Boston, and of course ones around where I live - but it truly does remind us of how tough those early settlers were - and how they persevered through faith and love.
    I'm having fun catching up with your trip posts - the VT inn looks wonderful and I adore the baby quilt your friend made you. Congrats on the Prims article, too!

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  8. Lovely, spooky photographs! I'm so glad you had a lovely trip through New England. I have to tell you a little story. A couple summers ago, a friend and I were exploring Marblehead. Earlier in the day while exploring Fort Sewall down the road, we stumbled upon a Revolutionary War (reenactment) camp, bustling with colonial soldiers. After, we wandered to Old Burial Hill. From the hill, we could see a large rowboat full of people in red coats coming in to the beach. The British reenactors landed and there was a huge faux battle with musket fire in the middle of the neighborhood. A couple of guys "captured" a local house and started shooting from the second floor window. It was all very dramatic and amusing - you never know what you'll find around here!

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  9. Glad I got to take you to all those New England graveyards. No one does it better than the puritans!

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Each and every comment is appreciated! Thanks for coming to visit me :) ~Heather

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